Perspective

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For geeks: Taken on a Nikon D610, Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8, ISO 3200, 20 second exposure WHEN YOU LOOK into the Milky Way (near the southern horizon this time of year) you’re looking into a “haze” caused by your eyes’ misperception of literally billions of points of light, each a star potentially circled by worlds like our own. At the center of of that haze lies a supermassive black hole, at least 4 million times the mass of our sun, trillions of miles away. I took this photo last night in a pretty remote area west of Colorado Springs, CO, USA. I’m a fan of challenging our perspectives, personal and collective. These terms (millions, billions, trillions) are really just incomprehensible. They’re completely foreign to our daily lives. For me, pictures like this and the thought they invoke have the power to change perspective—from that standard, normal, tired, daily frontal-lobe insularity to a felt … READ MORE…

On Receiving a Negative Review

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A little time lapse shot with the moon rising over a winter oak. 30 second interval. Outside of Castle Rock, Colorado. #nature #moon #picoftheday #video #timelapse #colorado #followforfollow #follow4follow #followme #instapic #instadaily #castlerock #photography #photooftheday A video posted by Will Burcher (@willburcher) on Feb 24, 2016 at 3:15pm PST A FEW WEEKS AGO, a first real negative review of The GAIAD. After I’d read the thing, it took a few moments to identify my reaction. A half-second after that, a mental double-take and a literal LOL. Though not at the review. The review itself was well-written, the author clearly in possession of an active and educated mind. I respected his opinion. Respect, however, can absolutely exist simultaneously with disagreement. This sounds elementary—indeed, it’s a tenet that should be taught (along with so many other important and overlooked things) more vigorously to kids at school and at home. How many seemingly … READ MORE…

“Perelandra” by C.S. Lewis—A Review

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4.5/5 stars “Perelandra” is the second book of the “Space Trilogy.” It is the best of the series. This series was my re-discovery of C.S. Lewis. Like many, I was exposed to “Narnia” as a kid. 20 years later I was admittedly biased toward the negative, thinking that his more “adult” works would be laden down with religious references or burdened by a rickety old Judeo-Christian moral scaffold. I was wrong. The references are certainly there; but his trilogy (and “Perelandra” in particular) is anything but “laden” or “burdened.” The questions posed within are primal, fundamental, universal. What would a human be like, unaffected, uncorrupted by the darkness of a modern soul or psyche? What would her nascent world be like? How would she view it? How would she view herself? The narrative orbits Lewis’ characterization of “Eve.” She is this book—at once naive and lordly, innocent and powerful, child-like and … READ MORE…

Prodigious

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This post is part 3 of 6 of the series Florida's Forgotten Coast

This post is part 3 of 6 of the series Florida’s Forgotten CoastVines below! (disclaimer) These are all small, relatively low-res cuts of a larger video I’m editing… THE LIFE HERE, the abundance. It is prodigious. My first night here was warm and wet and clear. I was staying at a house surrounded by acres of woods outside the small town of Sopchoppy, about 10 miles inland from the coast and known for its annual (yeah!) “Worm Gruntin’ Festival.” I stepped outside around 9PM to look upward—at a sky free of clouds, of stratospheric aircraft, of anything but stars and the familiar galactic haze of the Milky Way. The clarity, the visual lucidity of the night was striking—the scene in stark contrast to the nearly terrifying, natural din of the surrounding forest. The tumult came from every direction. Owls hooted, bullfrogs croaked and rumbled, their smaller cousins in the trees … READ MORE…

Anti-Gravity and the Pull of the Past

Police Academy Graduation, 2009.

“If you think you’re enlightened, go and spend a week with your parents.” —Ram Dass I’ve been spending a lot of time with my family lately—good time, quality time, with the people in this world I love most dearly. It renews me, recharges and inspires; and can be simultaneously frustrating. Even infuriating. These people are those with whom I share the most history. Here the past runs both heavy and deep. Much of my self-image has grown and developed through my interaction with, my history with them. And therein lies the rub. Our voluminous, shared past (along with love) defines these relationships. In college I once took an undergrad anthropology course from an excellent professor, Dr. Craig Palmer, now at the University of Missouri. He made a point that no relationship is stronger than that defined by blood, punctuated by the assertion (somewhat startling, but absolutely true) that any other … READ MORE…

A Positive Path

A fall day in Colorado. Above Geneva Creek, 90 mins west of Denver, 12,000 ft.

  I’m inclined to judge—people, places, my dogs, myself. I’m inclined like some rotten old tree, bent toward an undefined but clearly negative gravitational mass. And none of this is new, of course. I’m certainly not the only one afflicted by this proclivity. My mind, my ego, or the “I” of which “I” speak is effectively a resistance device, manufacturing judgment and negativity; bush-whacking through a daily span usually by toil and brow-sweat and a hell of a lot of swearing. But this I know. And therein lies the hope. With self-knowledge always comes a liberating ability—that of choice. I can choose to see that negative inclination for what it is and I can let go of it. Or at least I can sit back and watch the movie play out, knowing that “I” am that movie’s audience, not the film itself. And then, with practice, I can choose the … READ MORE…